Friday, June 23, 2017

The Butterfly Effect

I have never met a Butterfly I didn't like! Over the decades of photographing nature, I have captured quite a variety of species of Butterflies in their natural habitat. I never tire of watching them flittering around the flower gardens and wildflower fields in Summer. I personally consider them one of God's blessed creatures. They bring no harm to anyone and provide only joy and beauty to everyone. Hang on, we're going Buttering!

THE MONARCHS


Monarch Butterfly, Bernheim Arboretum, Clermont, Kentucky


Monarch Butterfly, Bernheim Arboretum, Clermont, Kentucky

These images of the Monarch I captured five years ago at Bernheim Arboretum in the flower gardens near the Pavilion. The Monarch Butterfly numbers have drastically declined over the course of the last decade. Now there is a new project called The Monarch Butterfly Research Project. Milkweed fields and gardens are being planted around the country to aid in bringing the numbers back up for the beautiful Monarch Butterfly. Let's hope we can save them from extinction by restoring their main food group.

THE SWALLOWTAILS



Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly, Bernheim Arboretum, Clermont, Kentucky

Our next Butterfly is the Swallowtail and I'm betting everyone viewing this post has seen one in their lifetime. And if not, I'm so sorry. This Eastern Tiger Swallowtail is partaking of the nectar at the Butterfly bushes in Bernheim Arboretum some five years ago. You can count on Swallowtails to frequent their favorite bushes, the Butterfly bush.


Eastern Black Swallowtail Butterfly, Bernheim Arboretum, Clermont, Kentucky


Eastern Black Swallowtail Butterfly, Bernheim Arboretum, Clermont, Kentucky

These Eastern Black Swallowtail Butterflies are cousins to the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail.. I captured these images first at the flower gardens at Bernheim Arboretum in Clermont, Kentucky and the second at Yew Dell Gardens in Crestwood, Kentucky several years ago. The first image shows an Eastern Black Swallowtail stopping at a Button bush at Bernheim while the second shows the bright Dallas Red Lantana at Yew Dell Gardens. Butterflies are attracted to bright orange, yellow, purple and red flowers? It's true.

THE CLOUDEDS


Yellow Clouded Butterfly, Yew Dell Gardens, Crestwood, Kentucky



Cabbage White Clouded Butterfly, Yew Dell Gardens, Crestwood, Kentucky

The Clouded Butterfly family are a much smaller species of Butterfly. Notice the single spot on their wings. Also, did you notice the clouded edge of the Yellow Clouded. Clouded Butterflies love the Butterfly Bush, Milkweed, Coneflowers, Alfalfa, Dandelions, Clover and Tall Verbena. I suppose you could call them the 'not so particular Butterfly'. It's very difficult to get really good images of these little Butterflies. They don't stay still long.

Before I leave you today, I wanted you to know I will have a second post on Butterflies to share soon. Have a fantastic weekend all. We are getting the remnants of Tropical Depression Cindy this weekend here in the mid state of Tennessee. Back soon. ENJOY!

8 comments :

  1. I love to go butterfly hunting too. your images are gorgeous Carol.

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    1. I am so glad you stopped by. I love these little creatures too and I love to go photographing them. Carol

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  2. Great captures! It's butterfly seasons here too right now. Watch for some next Sat.

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    1. I will. And thanks for stopping by. Who doesn't love Butters. Carol

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  3. Oh, these are wonderful. they make me want to go through and look for butterfly photos that I have taken over the years.

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  4. Do it Rose, go through and put them up on a post. I loved having a chance to find them in my photos and writing up a post on them. Thanks for stopping by, I love to hear from you. Carol

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  5. Hello Carol, your butterfly images are just beautiful. They could be in a art show. Thank you for linking up and sharing your post. Happy Saturday, enjoy your weekend.

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  6. Thank you Eileen. I appreciate your stopping by. Carol

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